Blac Sonic Hole - Paper [...] Through our work we aim to transcend the boundaries separating the fields of art and science, in relation to the concepts of the singularity, the forbidden and the taboo. Indeed, from a physical perspective, one would be pressed to find a better example of “forbidden places” in nature than Black Holes and their event horizons. The in􏰆nitely curved space around these 􏰃objects􏰄 could have also been considered taboo within the scientific community in the years prior to their actual discovery; with Einstein himself dismissing them as a mathematical simplification whose implications of a “singularity” could not carry over to the natural world. The poetics of such physical phenomena in the post digital age are evident through the analogy of “the crossing”, considering the event-horizon of the Black Hole as a threshold, a door into a point of no return where the commodified theoretical views which have dominated Western thinking and aesthetics for millennia are trapped into the edge of the immense, finding no validity in the current post-human present. This is both the liminal and the taboo: when scientists and artists are not currently fully capable of understanding what lies beyond the event horizon, we choose to leave it to the spectator, as a “user” of the sonic environment, to draw his or her own conclusions based on the experience, and take the leap...